Academics

2017 JANUARY SESSION and SPRING SEMESTER
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
October 27-November 4, 2016

    

Continuing students may register online or submit the completed Registration Form to the Office of the Registrar located in the One Stop Student Service Center (Admin Building, Room 20) according to the following schedule. New students will register by individual appointments with the Registrar.

Click here to view the 2017January Session or 2017 Spring Semester Schedules of Classes. The schedule can also be viewed using Search for Sections on WebAdvisor.

ONLINE REGISTRATION 

Students may register online through Gateway during the times listed below. Advisors must approve students for online registration.

Date/time

Current class standing (based on number of hours completed)

Oct 27

Beginning at 7 a.m. Graduate Students, Seniors, Juniors

Oct 28

Beginning at 7 a.m. Sophomores

Oct 31

Beginning at 7 a.m. First-Year Students

Nov 4

Online registration ends at 5 p.m.

REGISTRATION IN THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
Students may register in the person during or after - but not prior to - the appointed times listed below.

Date/time

Current class standing (based on number of hours completed)

Oct 31

Beginning at 8 a.m. Graduate Students, Seniors, Juniors

Nov 1

Beginning at 8 a.m. Sophomores

Nov 2

Beginning at 8 a.m. First-Year Students

Nov 4

Beginning at 8 a.m. Non-degree and guest students

Students not planning to enroll for the spring semester must complete the formal Exit Interview and Withdrawal procedures through the Success Center (260-982-5242).

Information about 2017 January Session off-campus courses and courses at other colleges is listed below.

Descriptions for new and temporary courses are listed below. See the 2016-2017 Manchester Undergraduate Catalog for other course descriptions.

ART 230 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ART - 3 hours
An overview of artistic media, genres, and stylistic periods of western art, beginning with pre-renaissance icons through contemporary art. Students will identify definitive characteristics of examples from each period and use those characteristics to guide classification and analysis of other art. C-4AR.

BUS 117 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 105)
Students examine the relationships, goals, and missions that are relevant in gaining a general understanding of the sport industry. Topics include the history and evolution of sport management, current trends in the profession, career options and professional development, and an introduction into the major areas of the field.

BUS 243 SPORT INFORMATION PRACTICES - 3 hours (formerly ESS 202)
Students investigate the fundamentals of communicating in a sports environment. Topics include sports information utilizing various media, effective public relations, and statistical methods and record keeping.

BUS 241 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT MANAGEMENT - 3 hours
Students examine the psychosocial and ethical factors involved in effective sport management. Topics include leadership, team dynamics, ethical dilemmas and decision making, international sport governance, and the intersection between sport management and various social institutions.

BUS 363 MARKETING AND SPONSORSHIP IN SPORT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 306)
Students examine principles of marketing and sponsorship related to the sport and fitness industry including professional sports, corporate fitness, college/high school athletics, clubs, and resorts. Topics include sport consumer behavior, market segmentation, applying marketing mix concepts, creating marketing plans, and creating sponsorship packages. Prerequisite: BUS 111

BUS 365 SPORT LAW - 3 hours (formerly ESS 309)
Students examine the legal concepts related to sport and physical activity. Topics include participation and eligibility issues, constitutional due process, Title IX and related administrative law, facility and employment contracts, and tort law applications to participants and spectators. Prerequisite: BUS-111

BUS 367 SPORT FOR DEVELOPMENT - 3 hours
Students examine how sport can be used as a catalyst for development and social change. Topics include the sociocultural impact of sport, sport as an intervention tool, grassroots and global programs using sport as a social change agent, ethical and environmental practices in sport management, and effective program development.

BUS 369 EVENT AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT - 3 hours (formerly ESS 310)
Students examine the multi-faceted nature of event and facility planning, organizing, and management. Topics include strategic planning in event and facility development, financing and revenue generation, event and facility operations, and evaluation. Prior completion of BUS 363 preferred. Prerequisite: BUS-117.

BUS 371 INTERNATIONAL SPORT GOVERNANCE - 3 hours (formerly ESS 311)
Students examine international issues in sport governance and business. Topics include the interaction between sport and culture, various practices in event and facility management, and an international understanding of the sports industry.  This is a travel course that will be taught outside the United States. C-3GC.

BUS 425 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNING POLICY IN SPORT - 3 hours
Students examine strategic management issues in the sport business industry. Topics include sport governance, policy development, effective organizational leadership and decision making, corporate social responsibility, and organizational change. Prerequisite: BUS-117, 363.

BUS T32 PRINCIPLED LEADERSHIP - 3 hours
Students explore leadership in multiple contexts including business, community, and other organizations.  Topics include styles and traits of both effective and ineffective leaders along with the role of organizational culture in leadership effectiveness.  No previous exposure to studying business is required or expected. C-3RC.

COMM T32 CRISIS COMMUNICATION - 3 hours
This course investigates theory and research on crisis communication. Students will examine case studies of strategies and tactics of organizations that have dealt with crises. The course aims to provide students with the principles and procedures for handling crisis situations within organizations. Prerequisite: COMM 260

CPTR T11 MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT - 3 hours
Students will learn the basics of the mobile environment, mobile development tools and basic programming concepts needed to create their own mobile Apps. The history and social/ethical impacts of mobile computing will also be addressed. This course assumes no previous programming experience.

ECON T22 GROWTH & SUSTAINABILITY - 3 hours
This course will investigate how economic growth/development in developing economies can affect environmental sustainability and how better public policy design can help to achieve sustainable economic growth. C-3GC. January.

HIST 2XX TOPICS IN HISTORY THROUGH VISUAL MEDIA - 3 hours
Popular perceptions of the past are often shaped by visual media: films, videos, documentaries, and other forms of modern electronic entertainment and information.  This course will examine and analyze selected topics in history by comparing how they appear in visual presentation with evidence gleaned from readings, lectures, and discussions.  May be repeated on different topics. January.

HIST 242 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: ANCIENT TO 1500 - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 BCE to the advent of the Mughal Empire in the mid-1500s CE through a focus on: the Indus Valley civilization, Hinduism’s role in the evolving socio-political structures, the emergence of centralized empires, early religious reform efforts in the form of Buddhism, and Jainism, and the advent of Islamic kingdoms in the region.  Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 300 BCE to 1500 CE with an emphasis on the early kingdoms in the region and the evolution of the economy and religious beliefs during this period. C-3GC. 

HIST 246 SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: 1500 TO PRESENT - 3 hours
This course primarily surveys the history of South Asia from c.1500 CE to the present through a focus on: the Mughal Empire, European expansion into South Asia, the establishment of the British Raj, the development of nationalism, the establishment of the modern nation-states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and major developments of the last 60 years in the region. Secondarily, the course broadly surveys the history of Southeast Asia from c. 1500 CE to the present with an emphasis on the region’s interactions with the outside world, particularly the West, the spread of colonialism, the development of nationalist resistance to it, the establishment of modern nation-states in the region, and the political challenges facing the nations of Southeast Asia today.  C-3GC.

HIST 263 THE MAKING OF INDIA AND PAKISTAN - 3 hours
This course examines a seminal event of the twentieth century – the partition of the Indian subcontinent at the end of British rule in 1947 into India and Pakistan – an event that rivals the Holocaust in the horrors it unleashed. It engages with the Partition through historians’ writings as well as through film and literature. The course also explores the legacies of Partition for both the relationship between India and Pakistan and international politics. C-3GC

IDIV T12 GRE PREPARATION - 0.5 hour
This course is intended for juniors and seniors who intend to take the general GRE (Graduate Record Examination) as part of their application to graduate school.  The goal of the course is to provide preparation and practice, and topics will include general test-taking strategies, specific GRE strategies, GRE math review, and suggestions for studying vocabulary.  This course is useful to students in any major, but may only be taken once for credit. P/NP.

INTD T35 EMOTION IN THE WORKPLACE - 3 hours
This course explores the different ways emotion is constructed through communication and interaction, and how emotional norms are perpetuated and naturalized through employee talk and organizational structures. Students engage in meaningful discussions and learn strategies for dealing communicatively with emotion in the workplace. Micro-practices including emotional labor, social support, compassion, and empathy are emphasized.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

INTD 427 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S RIGHTS - 3 hours 
This course examines the place of women and their rights in the debate on universalism vs. cultural relativism.  It analyzes this debate and its consequences for women through a focus on practices such as female genital cutting, sati, honor killings, female infanticide, and others. The course will also consider the prospects that feminist intervention in the debate holds for safeguarding women’s rights as it attempts to transcend the limitations of both universalism and cultural relativism. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. C-5CC.

MATH 108 NUMBER SENSE FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS - 2 hours 
An in-depth treatment of concepts underlying common topics in the elementary mathematics curriculum including: number theory and representation, operations and their properties, functions, and algebraic thinking. Use of selected concrete manipulatives and technology is included. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or high placement.

MATH 242 DATA ANALYTICS - 3 hours
A survey of quantitative techniques and computing tools used to identify patterns in massively large data sets.  Such patterns are used to categorize behavioral trends and customize organizational responses, either toward specific target audiences or on an individualized basis.  Applications will include areas such as:  on-line behavior, social media usage, purchasing preferences, voting patterns, athletic performance, and health outcomes. Prerequisite: MATH-115, 210 or 240, or PSYC-241.

MATH T24 CONTEST PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 hour
Supervised preparation for and participation in intercollegiate mathematics competitions.  A variety of mathematical problem-solving strategies will be presented and applied to contest-level problems. Participation in at least one competition is required. May be repeated to a maximum of four hours. Prerequisite: MATH-122 or concurrent enrollment. P/NP

MATH T2X MATHEMATICS IN CULTURE - 3 hours
This course examines the development of some aspect of mathematics at a certain place during a certain time period.  The course emphasizes how the history, geography, technology, and culture in that location and time influenced the mathematics that was developed and how the mathematics influenced those aspects of society.  Students will explore these topics while visiting the location under study. The place and era will vary.  This course is designed for a general audience and may not be used for credit in the mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher placement. C-3GC.

MODL T11 ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I - 3 hours
An introduction to American Sign Language and the Deaf community.  Includes common signs, fingerspelling, basic conversational skills, and cultural considerations related to the Deaf community; instruction supplemented by language laboratory practice.

MODL T12 ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II - 3 hours 
Emphasis on conversational ASL and increasing fluency and vocabulary. Receptive and expressive skills are stressed. Introduces ASL grammar and multi-meaning words by comparing ASL with spoken English. Instruction supplemented by language laboratory practice.  Explores social, educational, and vocational issues in the Deaf community. Prerequisite: MODL T11.

JANUARY 2017 OFF-CAMPUS COURSES

Off-campus courses are marked as OC on the Schedule of Classes. Contact the instructor for more details about individual travel courses. 

BUS 371 International Sport Governance C-3GC
Instructor: Ryan Hedstrom
Location: Ireland and United Kingdom
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Hedstrom
From an academic perspective Ireland & the U.K offer fantastic opportunities for students to visit and study the European model of sport & international sport business. The origins of many of the world's most popular sports today lay in the codification of traditional British games. Ireland provides a great contrast to the U.K in that they play traditional Gaelic Games such as Gaelic football & Hurling as well as non-traditional games exported from Britain such as soccer & rugby. This program will take students inside the European Model of Club Sports and Business where they will receive firsthand experience at various facilities, clubs, universities and other sporting organizations and businesses. Students will also study the business of mega-events such as the Olympics and Wimbledon. Apply now for a passport. More information: Contact Professor Hedstrom

ECON T22 Growth & Sustainability C-3GC
Instructor: Sreenath Majumder
Location: India
Approximate cost: $3200-3500.
This intensive travel course will include various tiger reserves and national park forests of India. It provides the opportunity to learn how rapid economic growth is affecting the delicate eco system and environmental balance in India. We also visits New Delhi, Taj Mahal, and Rajasthan. The total travel portion will be 17 days, including 3 days of flying. The course fee includes: international airfare, lodging, in-country transportation, most meals, travel insurance, visa cost, and all required entrance fees. All majors and all levels of students are welcome. First-year students are especially encouraged. Apply now for a passport. Fulfills Core-3GC and an elective in the ECON major/minor. 
More information: Contact Professor Majumder

EDUC 216 Building Communities in Schools C-3RC
Instructor: Heather Schilling
Location: Georgia and Alabama
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Schilling
Whether we have a connection to schools through our own children, as classroom teachers, or as community members, the intricate relationships between schools and their communities impact each of us. EDUC 216 explores the ways schools reflect the communities around them. Poverty, socio-economic status, and race often play an integral role in these relationships, and based on its historical roots and cultural diversity, Atlanta provides the perfect classroom in which we can explore these relationships. Besides the relationships, course content explores education as a social and civil right, and Atlanta affords us with a chance to walk in the footsteps of some of the largest leaders of the American Civil Rights movement. For nearly two weeks, the class will explore Atlanta, visiting key historical places such the Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birth home, Ebenezer Baptist Church, International World Peace Rose Garden, Morehouse College, and the many hidden secrets of the urban setting. 

After the first weekend of exploring historic Atlanta, a week will be spent in an urban school volunteering in classrooms and implementing a team-based service learning project. A second weekend overnight excursion via a train to Alabama will provide the class with additional explorations of historical Civil Rights locations. The trip will conclude with the celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in Atlanta at the King Center. Led by two dynamic professors from the Department of Education, students from all majors will enjoy this exploration of Atlanta, working with schools, eating soul food, listening to blues music, learning to ride public transportation, walking through the steps of the Civil Rights movement, and learning important things about themselves; the course is open to all students regardless of their majors.
More information: Contact Prof Schilling

ESS 313 International Sports Medicine C-3GC
Instructor: Jeff Beer
Location: Ireland and United Kingdom
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Beer
From an academic perspective Ireland & the U.K offer fantastic opportunities for students to visit and study the European model of sports medicine. These specific regions have unique medical professionals, health care, and sports medicine teams to compare and contrast. Students will explore the country sides, history, and culture while staying close to the sports medicine focus. This class will take students inside the European Model of Health Care and Sports Medicine where they will receive firsthand experience and knowledge at various facilities, clubs, universities and other sporting events. Prior completion of ESS 251 and 253 is preferred. Get your passport as soon as possible if interested and contact Professor Jeff Beer for any questions.
Objectives for this course are:
1.      Understand the European model of sports medicine
2.      Understand the organization and sports medicine structure of Gaelic sports, cricket, rugby, and football
3.      Understand the education and experience needed for a sports medicine team member   
4.      Understand how history and social structures (religion, race, etc.) affect a sporting culture
5.      Increase understanding of how to travel effectively and efficiently
More information: Contact Prof Beer

FREN 110 Inside France C-3GC
Instructor:  Janina Traxler
Location:  France
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Traxler
This course explores France through three of its most important and exciting cities:  Paris, Lyon, and Strasbourg.  Chosen for their cultural diversity, their importance to France (historically and currently), and their distinct personalities, these cities offer students an introduction to many facets of French culture—from world-famous museums and monuments to many different cuisines, from Roman ruins to modern European institutions, from Parisian baguettes to Alsatian tarte flambée.  Course content includes an introduction to French language; a survey of ideas, personalities and events that define France; and an examination of the distinctive features of French daily life.  Students will develop travel skills as they use the métro, the super-fast train, and the tramway.
More information: Contact Dr. Janina P. Traxler (jptraxler@manchester.edu).

IDIV 240 Making of the Modern Mind C-3GC
Instructors: Greg Clark & Steve Naragon
Location: London and Paris
Approximate cost: $3100
How did we become who we are?  We moderns think, act, dress, view the world, and view ourselves, in ways radically different from our medieval ancestors. Come explore these human revolutions in the two European cities — London and Paris — where many of these changes first emerged. Course readings and activities draw from the sciences, philosophy, art, and history. We will meet on campus for three days, followed by two weeks in London and Paris. Click here for more information.
More information: Contact Prof Clark or Prof Naragon

MATH T2X Mathematics in Culture C-3GC
Instructor: Tim Brauch
Location: Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, Sarajevo, Dubrovnik, Ljubljana, Venice, and Rome. 
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Brauch
This course begins in the domain of the House of Habsburg, the former capital of the Holy Roman Empire from 1438-1740. After touring the city, sipping cappuccinos, and enacting the philosophical and mathematical discussions of the famed "Vienna Circle" we depart for Prague, which vies with Paris for the most beautiful city in Europe. Then we're off to the Pearl of the Danube River, the Hungarian city of Budapest. An afternoon cruise will offer the opportunity to consider the importance of cultural context for mathematical discovery and creativity. We then move through Romania to Sarajevo while reflecting on the spiritual writings of those that sought peace amidst a region divided by religious convictions. We then head to the sea for a tour of the marble streets and baroque buildings of Dubrovnik. As we consider the relationship between the religious quest and the mathematical quest for truth on the Adriatic Sea we move up to Slovenia visiting the quaint city of Ljubljana, also the Green Capital of Europe. Then we're off to Venice where we tour the museums and cathedrals and explore the labyrinthine streets and canals searching for the best tomato sauce. We finish our tour in Rome and Vatican City. 
More information: Contact Prof Timothy Brach

NASC 310 Medical Practicum
Instructor: Jeff Osborne
Location: Nicaragua
Approximate Cost: $2300 
The Medical Practicum provides an opportunity for students to experience health care in a less-developed country by living and working with physicians, dentists, pharmacists in order to run a clinic in rural Nicaragua. Three credits, P/NP only, and open to any major.
Go to www.medicalpracticum.org for an application and more details, or contact Professor Osborne.

PEAC 333 Peace Issues: Utopian Experiments, Intentional Communities and Countercultural Movements
Instructor: Katy Gray Brown
Location: Midwest and Southeast United States
Approximate cost: $900
What is the ideal community, and how have people tried to create it? This course will examine visionary societies in the United States and visit people trying to create alternative models of community. Readings will include philosophical, religious, and fictional works which depict different understandings of the ideal society. Approximately two and a half weeks will be spent off campus, visiting different intentional communities in the Midwest and Southeast United States. 
More information: Contact Prof Gray Brown

PSYC 201 Social Psychology C-3RC
Instructor: Marcie Coulter-Kern
Location: France
Approximate Cost: Contact Prof Coulter-Kern
More information: Contact Prof Coulter-Kern

PSYC 385 Seminar: Applied
Instructor: Rusty Coulter-Kern
Location: Disney World, Florida
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Coulter-Kern
This class will examine what the Disney Corporation has done to create a warm and welcoming environment for their guests. It will focus on years of research on Quality Service by the Disney Corporation that can be used to transform any work or service setting. The class will also provide a brief introduction to the field of Industrial-Organizational Psychology and the methods these Psychologists use to transform and improve the workplace. We will meet on campus initially and then spend five days at Disneyworld. While at Disneyworld we will participate in a Disney Leadership Training Workshop. We will also analyze the effectiveness of their focus on quality and service at a variety of locations throughout Disneyworld. In this course students will also learn how to create surveys that gives useful information that can be used to analyze and understand any work or non-profit setting. There is no prerequisite and the class is open to all majors.
More information: Contact Prof Coulter-Kern

REL 266 Religious Classics C-4LT
Instructor: Justin Lasser
Location: Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, Sarajevo, Dubrovnik, Ljubljana, Venice, and Rome. 
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Lasser
This course begins in the domain of the House of Habsburg, the former capital of the Holy Roman Empire from 1438-1740. After touring the city, sipping cappuccinos, and enacting the philosophical and mathematical discussions of the famed "Vienna Circle" we depart for Prague, which vies with Paris for the most beautiful city in Europe. Then we're off to the Pearl of the Danube River, the Hungarian city of Budapest. An afternoon cruise will offer the opportunity to consider the importance of cultural context for mathematical discovery and creativity. We then move through Romania to Sarajevo while reflecting on the spiritual writings of those that sought peace amidst a region divided by religious convictions. We then head to the sea for a tour of the marble streets and baroque buildings of Dubrovnik. As we consider the relationship between the religious quest and the mathematical quest for truth on the Adriatic Sea we move up to Slovenia visiting the quaint city of Ljubljana, also the Green Capital of Europe. Then we're off to Venice where we tour the museums and cathedrals and explore the labyrinthine streets and canals searching for the best tomato sauce. We finish our tour in Rome and Vatican City. 
More information: Contact Prof Lasser

SOWK 350 Policy & Practice Issues in Social Welfare: Vietnam Moving On: Ancient lands, modern development, healing from colonization and war
Instructor: Cheri Krueckeberg
Location: Vietnam
Approximate cost: Contact Prof Krueckeberg
This trip to Vietnam will be first based in Ho Chi Minh City (old Saigon), and include shared experiences with Vietnam National University faculty and students.  We will explore social welfare efforts, with some foci on people with disabilities, orphaned children and elders; also included will be opportunities for short, meaningful service projects at various social service agencies.  Within this city (the approximate size of New York City), we will also visit Bitexco Financial Tower; famous temples, pagodas, and cathedrals; War Remnants Museum; the Reunification Palace.  We will spend a few days in more rural areas such as the Central Highlands, Mekong Delta, and ocean-side towns.  Our time in Vietnam will also include exploration of art, music, food and culture of this unique and beautiful country. Vietnam is an ideal place to study post-conflict efforts to improve the human condition. No prerequisites
More information: Contact Prof Krueckeberg

ADDITIONAL JANUARY SESSION OPPORTUNITIES

Many colleges across the country offer a January Session similar to Manchester’s. Students who would like to experience life on another campus may elect to attend another college during January Session. Colleges attended in previous January Sessions or who have invited Manchester University students to attend include:

Huntington University (Indiana)
McPherson College (Kansas)
Saint Olaf College (Minnesota)
University of La Verne (California)

Contact the Registrar for more information.